by

“Lukey” Ward

December 10, 2010 in 1950s-1960s, 1960s-1970s, Political history, Social history

Lucretia “Lukey” Ward was different from most affluent, white women in Louisville, KY. Ms. Ward took a stand against the inequalities in Louisville, KY and all over the South. Like her friend, Senator Georgia Davis Powers, Ward believed in the equality for all; African Americans, women, children, and the poor. She became active in politics, vying for the candidates who believed in the same equalities as she did and also in many activist groups. Together, Ward and Senator Powers founded the Allied Organization for Civil Rights, along side Alfred Daniel (A.D.) Williams King, the brother of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Throughout her career as an activist, she participated in countless marches, which were fundamental to bringing change to Kentucky and the United States. The two most mentioned marches she was a part of were the march on Frankfort taking place March 4, 1964 in which Martin Luther King Jr. and J. Robinson were in attendance of, as well as the March in Selma, AL in March of 1965. Ward continually devoted her time to local marches in Louisville, in which their main goal was to grant open housing for all. Along with co-founding the Allied Organization for Civil Rights, she also co-founded the Louisville chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Nationally, the organizations first president was Dr. Martin Luther King, who she had knew personally in the last several years of his life. Lukey Ward continued her activism for equal rights all throughout her life. Her son, Mike Ward, became a U.S. Congressman.

1 response to “Lukey” Ward

  1. It is neat to learn about another lady who worked with Senator Powers! Our class had an exciting experience with Senator Powers where we were able to learn about the many feats of her life.

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