You are browsing the archive for 1960s-1970s.

AAUW Community Action Grant proposal features KYWCRH.org Open Knowledge Initiative

January 23, 2014 in 1960s-1970s, Oral history, Research methods

AAUW logoAfter several weeks of planning and creating new partnerships here in central Kentucky, I submitted an AAUW Community Action Grant for 2014 that features our KYWCRH.org initiative. The title of the proposal nearly tells the whole story (it’s long enough, anyway):

Empowering Girls in Central KY with Digital Humanities and Writing Wikipedia Code: Women’s History and the 1964 March on Frankfort for Civil Rights

Here’s the list of partners who wrote letters in support of the proposal:

When the project moves forward, it is exciting to know that it is likely that there will be many more organizations and people involved.

The aim of this proposal is to engage women and girls in researching, collecting and recording women’s civil rights history in Kentucky. In support of the Fayette County Race, Community & Child Welfare initiative, the proposal builds on the commemoration of the 1964 March on Frankfort by spotlighting the work of Kentucky women in that event – before and after. The target audience is 10 families whose teenaged girls are/were part of the Fayette Co. child welfare system. The partner organizations will recruit those who are African-American/Black or Hispanic/Latino or mixed race to work together on oral history and multi-media projects. The girls, together with one or more family member, will partner with University of Kentucky undergraduate female students to learn about their community’s leaders and strategies undertaken by politically active citizens and organizations to improve the quality of life for all.  In brief, the proposed program will rely on collaboration among the above partners in these four major components:

  1. Learning about Kentucky women’s history in the context of the 1964 March on Frankfort (for desegregation of public accommodations and the implementation of fair housing laws) through a series featuring Kentucky civil rights activists and oral history projects.
  2. Orientation and training in appropriate use of research resources and digital media for creative digital storytelling and for the development of general knowledge articles on women in Wikipedia. Learning how to find and use community resources and government documents crucial for our citizens to use in life-long learning and for self-empowerment.
  3. Training in and applying skills in basic coding languages used commonly in creating webpages and social media – HyperText Markup Language (HTML) – for the KYWCRH.org site and the markup coding used in creating effective Wikipedia pages. A Kentucky WikiMeetup will allow for the teams to work with experienced Wikipedia editors.
  4. Developing skills in civic leadership and college/career readiness modeled by local community members in partnership with higher education students and faculty.

CKCPJ and the Lexington-Fayette NAACP branch will collaborate to offer a series of community-based lectures, films and neighborhood walks on KY civil rights history and women’s roles. The Project Director will work with the UK Nunn Center to prepare and train project members in how to conduct oral history interviews (to be digitally archived in the OHMS database) and with MATRIX staff at MSU to teach UK undergraduates and their partner teams to create multimedia projects showcased in a redesigned KYWCRH.org Open Knowledge Initiative. The celebratory showcase will not only celebrate the project teams’ work but also increase the visibility of AAUW-KY’s contributions toward achieving educational opportunities and equitable resources for women and girls.

The proposed timeline is for the program to begin in Summer 2014 and conclude by the end of the school year in Spring 2015:

Summer 2014: 10 girls aged 13-17 selected from a pool of applicants recruited from the Fayette Co. RCCW target audience. Lexington NAACP and CKCPJ plan a community-based series (lectures, films, neighborhood-walks) by experts in civil rights activism, history and racism in the U.S.  The series is recorded and posted on KYWCRH.org – which will be updated and redesigned courtesy of MATRIX at Michigan State. The families involved in the project will be encouraged to ask for reimbursements to reoup costs for childcare and food costs to attend project-related activities as well as transportation to conduct oral history interviews, to work with the UK undergraduate students while research or working on multimedia projects at the University, or other required meetings with the project director.

Fall 2014: UK offers EXP396 (Experiential Education) and faculty oversee learning contracts for each of the 10 undergraduate females recruited. UK students will be trained in the use of the oral history interviewing equipment available from the UK Libraries Oral History Department. Also in the UK Libraries for students are the PresentationU and Media Depot @ the Hub which support the students and community partners as they build their Wikipedia articles and multimedia projects showcased on KYWCRH.org Open Knowledge Initiative. The educational series and training meetings with the project teams will take place at The Plantory (in Lexington’s East End neighborhood) or Imani Family Center (north of Lexington) during the Fall and Spring. The project partners will also journey to the Kentucky State Capital to visit the Kentucky Commission on Women offices and to view the Kentucky Women Remembered exhibit. The families and their undergraduate mentors will take the free School of Open course (either self-paced or live webinar sessions) on Wikipedia. Basic training in coding and publishing in Wikipedia will accompany skillbuilding exercises in how to find and analyze general resources in the community and government documents crucial for citizens to use for self-empowerment.

Spring 2015: The oral history interview digital files are processed by the Nunn Oral History Center staff and indexed for use by the project teams and community in the OMHS data repository. A Wiki-Meetup allows the teams to work on their entries in a face-to-face setting with experienced Wikipedia editors. The project teams are invited by the UK Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education to present their digital media projects in April at the UK Undergraduate Research Showcase. The AAUW Bluegrass Central Branch hosts a celebratory showcase event and highlights specific projects via social media.

 

 

My Friend Suzy

October 11, 2013 in 1960s-1970s, Primary source

An update on the Suzy Post project (http://www.kywcrh.org/projects/kchr-hall-of-fame/post).

When I signed up to do a project on civil rights activist Suzanne Post, I was highly unaware of what all I would gain from that project. Suzy is a phenomenal woman, and she went from a figure in history, to a personal friend of mine. In studying her, I learned of her conviction and dedication. In knowing her, I have learned of her charisma, sweetness, and true passion. Since the interview, I have been fortunate to have correspondence, as well as to meet with Suzy again.  We have plans to meet up in the fall.

As a fellow activist, I find her insight invaluable.  She continues, despite her age, to be involved within the community.  She has never given up on the issues she is passionate about. Conversations with her provide a perspective unlike any other- a woman that has been through so much, and persevered so honorably. She never runs out of solid advice or stories.

This experience has reminded me the importance of seeking out the exceptional people within our communities. I want to raise Suzy up, to provide a role model for young girls across Kentucky and beyond. Imagine if a generation of young girls and women aspired to be more like Suzy, and less like the common idols and role models perpetrated by modern media. I believe in intelligent women, in women of substance, in women who can stand up and make a change even when it’s easier to be silent.

I am so thankful for the experience with KYWCRM for introducing me to a role model, mentor, and friend for life, Suzy Post.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzy_Post

Celebrating Women’s Equality Day

August 26, 2013 in 1920s-30s, 1960s-1970s, Political history

Women’s Equality Day is on August 26th – a date selected by Congress in 1971 to commemorate the 1920 passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting all women the right to vote across the nation. As you can tell from this series of video clips of Bella Abzug (D-NY), the Congresswoman who led the campaign to create this celebration, it took an outspoken woman to make this happen.

The observance of Women’s Equality Day also calls attention to our continuing efforts toward full equality (see more at the National Women’s History Project website).

This year the Kentucky Commission on Women (KCW) is sponsoring the showing of “Makers: Women Who Make America.” The PBS film documentary (3 one-hour segments) is narrated by Oscar-winning actress and activist, Meryl Streep, and gives an in-depth, bi-partisan examination of the women’s movement in America over the past 50 years.

Makers: Women Who Make AmericaThe film has 3 parts:

  • Part One: Awakening (the start of the post-WW2 women’s movement)
  • Part Two: Changing the World (1970s feminism and backlash)
  • Part Three: Charting a New Course (focusing in on the workplace and the “glass ceiling”)

According to the KCW’s website, the following celebration events took place across Kentucky this year:

August 19, 2013

  • The Greater Hardin County Women’s Network, 458 Congress Drive, Radcliff, KY 40160
    Contact: Nancy Chancellor-Cox 270-272-2281
August 25, 2013
  • All Nation Worship Ministries, 110 Wisely, Radcliff, KY 40160
    Contact: Jeannette Stephens 270-300-5728
August 26, 2013
  • Morehead State University Student Activities, 150 University Blvd., Morehead, KY 40351
    Contact: Shante Hearst 606-783-2668 or Laken Gilbert 606-748-4864
  • League of Women Voters of Louisville, 115 S. Ewing, Louisville, KY 40206
    Contact: Pat Murrell 502-895-5218
  • Midway College Student Affairs, 512 E. Stephens Street, Midway, KY 40347
    Contact: Jessica Combess 859-846-5390
  • Lexington Public Library, 140 East Main Street, Lexington, KY 40507
    Contact: AnnaMarie Cornett 859-231-5501
  • Gateway Community & Technical College, 525 Scott Blvd, Covington, KY 41011
    Contact: Kathy Driggers 859-442-416
  • Campbell County Library, 1000 Highland Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY 41075
    Campbell County Library Event Flyer.docxCampbell County Library Event Flyer.docx
    Contact: Joan Gregory 859-802-8785 or Karkie Tackett 859-781-1844
  • University of Kentucky, Main Building, Visitors Center UK Women's Equality Day Flyer.pdfUK Women’s Equality Day Flyer.pdf
    Contact: Randolph Hollingsworth 859-257-3027
  • JCTC-Downtown, WIN Committee and Women’s & Gender Studies, Louisville
    Contact: Jill Adams 502-213-2364
August 27
  • Coalition of Labor Union Women MLWPC FLYER.doc MLWPC flyer 2013 (4).doc
    UAW Local 862, 3000 Fern Valley Road, Louisville, KY 40213
    Contact: Virginia Woodward 502-541-5526 or Vera Newton 502-364-3973
  • University of Kentucky Panel of Scholars: Discussing the Status of Women Today—Local, State, National and Global  Women's Equality Day 2013 - Tuesday.pdfWomen’s Equality Day 2013 – Tuesday.pdf
    Contact: Randolph Hollingsworth, RSVP Institutional Diversity 859-257-9293
  • Women of Daviess County, Owensboro Area Museum, 3870 W 2nd (60W), Owensboro, KY 42301
    Contact: Rachel Foster 270-314-1226

Kentucky Black Heritage now online

June 20, 2013 in 1960s-1970s, Historiography, Primary source

Mrs. W.H. Faus, circa 1944

Mrs. W.H. Faus of Lexington, holding a certificate of appointment to serve on the KY Commission for the Study of Negro Affairs, created in 1944 by Gov. Simean Willis.

The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights recently announced that its out-of-print history reference book, Kentucky’s Black Heritage: The Role of the Black People in the History of Kentucky from Pioneer Days to the Present (1971), can now be downloaded in its entirety from the Commission’s website. The Commission had charged a committee of prestigious scholars – including one woman and several men of color – and support staff to create it as a textbook supplement for Kentucky junior high school history courses. Only five years before, in 1966, the Kentucky Civil Rights Act had passed. The book is free and now widely available to the public.

Filled with photographs and profiles of many African Americans in the history of Kentucky from pioneer days through the 1960s, the book is still an interesting resource for us to use today. Though few passages in the book refer to women, there are some key points that make the book still valuable, especially for those of us searching for ways to craft a more inclusive narrative about Kentucky’s history.

It was common all through the Civil Rights Era to overlook and to forget to document women’s participation in the Movement – and this book was compiled and published just as Black Power and the feminist movements were taking off.  This booklet is no exception even though its purpose was to correct the wrongs of discrimination and exclusivity in traditional, mainstream histories.

The Kentucky Black History Committee for the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights were listed at the back of the book (pp. 141-144). There were 15 African-American and 2 white members:

  • Dr. Eleanor Y. Alsbrook

    Dr. Eleanor Young Alsbrook, KY Black History Committee

    Dr. Eleanor Young Alsbrook (daughter of Whitney Young, Sr.), assistant professor and assistant dean, University of Louisville

  • Dr. Rufus B. Atwood, President-Emeritus, Kentucky State College
  • Dr. Henry E. Cheaney, professor and chair of Afro-American Studies, Kentucky State College
  • Mr. Charles Franklin Hinds, Director of Libraries, Murray State University
  • Mr. Lyman T. Johnson, Assistant Principal, Manly Junior High School, and Treasurer of Louisville NAACP
  • Mr. Howitt C. Mathis, Superintendent, West KY State Vocational-Technical School (Paducah)
  • Mr. James O’Rourke, Head Librarian, Kentucky State College
  • Dr. Charles H. Parrish, professor-emeritus at University of Louisville, acting chair of Division of Social Sciences, Lincoln University
  • Dr. William H. Perry, Jr., Grand Sec’y of Prince Hall Grand Lodge, F.& A.M. of Kentucky; Deputy for Kentucky, the United Supreme Council, 33 degree, Southern Jurisdiction
  • Mr. Alvin M. Seals, assistant professor, Kentucky State College and President of Lexington Montessori Society
  • Mr. Frank B. Simpson, assistant superintendent, Jefferson County Schools
  • Tava Taylor

    Tava Taylor, staff support for KY Black History Comm.

    Mr. Maurice Strider, assistant professor, Morehead State University

  • Dr. Rhea A. Taylor, associate professor, University of Kentucky
  • Dr. George D. Wilson, professor emeritus, Kentucky State College
  • Dr. Whitney M. Young, Sr., President-Emeritus, Lincoln Institute
  • Miss Tava Taylor, student at Kentucky State College
  • Miss Charlotte Dunne, student at Eastern Kentucky University

The three women who were on the Committee probably felt tremendous pride in getting the book out at all.  I can’t help but wonder, though, if any one of them had wished for more information on women’s history to include in the book.  It may have changed some of the narrative as well when expressing the history of an event or series of events from a woman’s perspective too.

Charlotte Dunne

Charlotte Dunne, staff support for KY Black History Comm.

In addition to these women, the acknowledgements (p. 145) showed that more women scholars were involved in the creation of the booklet.  Librarian Jacqueline P. Bull (director of Special Collections and Archives) at the University of Kentucky, Mrs. Amelia Buckley of Keeneland Racetrack Library, Librarian Elizabeth Gilbert of the Hutchins Library at Berea College as well as Barbara Miller from the Louisville Free Public Library are thanked for helping the Committee members with information and archival materials.  Mrs. Charles Farnsley of the Lost Cause Press, Mrs. Lillie Gleaves of the Jefferson County Department of Welfare are also mentioned for helping to research facts and aiding the Committee in acquiring many of the rare pictures published in this book.

It’s worth taking a moment to reflect on how these women worked to create the book – and to wonder if they had been able to craft a different book than the one we now have in our possession.

 

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

April 29, 2013 in 1960s-1970s

As the semester is winding down, we are hard at work to finish up the projects for the Civil Rights Hall of Fame. Our project on Anne Braden is coming along nicely, as Emme23 and I have officially begun sorting our information into six separate sections and divided up the responsibilities of creating our six pages based on the research and information we’ve gathered from so many different sources this semester.

Our six pages will be: Background/Family Life, Chronology, Journalism, Activism, Pictures/Quotes, and Additional Resources. We feel these distinctions will best serve anyone looking for information about Anne McCarty Braden.

It is very rewarding to watch a full semester’s work come together in a singular place. I am very hopeful that this resource will be useful for future students looking for information about Anne Braden. This semester I have learned of her strength, her dignity, her dedication, and her passion. My hope for this project is that we are able to share that tremendous personality with other students and researchers. I truly hope that Anne’s personality and dedication shine through, and that Emme23 and I are merely the vessel through which it arrives.

 

The Work is Far From Over

April 28, 2013 in 1940s-1950s, 1950s-1960s, 1960s-1970s, Intellectual history, Oral history, Social history

The end of the semester has finally arrived and our final project on Audrey Grevious has been posted (http://www.kywcrh.org/projects/kchr-hall-of-fame/grevious). Without question, I thought rather pessimistically about our contributions to this project for most of the semester. Consistently, I thought in terms of quantity rather than quality in consideration of how much (or rather how little) information we were able to gather about Grevious. While our investigations and connections seemed less than successful at times, I have come to realize that our work has indeed been significant. I have learned SO much about Audrey Grevious and the movement in its entirety throughout this process and also hope that I have helped illuminate her life for others conducting similar research.

After utilizing the internet, texts, and most importantly, oral history interviews, I have observed the transformation of history and its record in just a period of 50 short years. The work my class has done this semester has been incredible – listening to the experiences of brave women, reading and analyzing literature about their lives, and even meeting them personally to record new history. I have never been more impressed with the success of a class.

Something I found very interesting from one of Audrey Grevious’ interviews that I studied closely was the following quote:

“And I feel like the generation now have lost out on that sort of thing. There’s not that closeness. There’s not that interweaving of cultures, of friendships, of anything.”

While this may be true from her perspective, from what I’ve gathered through all our research, today’s generation is better connected and more intertwined than ever. In examining the stories and backgrounds of students in our class alone, the sensitivity of our generation is ever increasing thus constantly embracing cultural difference and promoting friendships every day.

Martha Layne Collins

April 23, 2013 in 1960s-1970s

As has been stated before, I am currently working on a project highlighting Martha Layne Collins’ contributions to civil rights in Kentucky.  This task has proven much more difficult than originally assumed.  When beginning the project we had intentions of interviewing Collins.  As the project has progressed we have learned that task was much harder than originally expected.  As a group, we expected people to be generally willing to help and intrigued with our research.  In actuality, that has not always been the case.  Some people we contacted did not feel as though they had the information to help us, such as the principal of Shelby County High School, but would pass our information along to people of the community he felt could contribute to our research.  When we were connected with those people we were not always met with open arms.  No one was ever rude to us, they just gave us the feeling as though contributing to our research was not as important as the other things they had to tend to.  Usually, this meant they would pass the buck to someone else.  This was what most of our time researching consisted of, contacting someone for them to tell us someone else to contact.  Because of this, unfortunately, we have not made the progress we had hoped to make on this project.

by mookygc

Trip to Frankfort, Kentucky

April 23, 2013 in 1960s-1970s, Economic history, Social history

A couple of weeks ago, April was declared “Fair Housing Month” by the governor of Kentucky, Steve Beshear, in honor of the Fair Housing Proclamation’s 45th anniversary. Luckily, my honors professor decided that it would be beneficial for our class to attend the remembrance ceremony.

On our trip to the capital, we got the privilege of meeting Eleanor Jordan, the director of the Kentucky Commision on Kentucky Women. Jordan walked us through the “Kentucky Women Remembered” exhibit, a series of portraits that honors the many varied accomplishments of strong Kentucky Women, that hangs on the capital’s walls. It was inspiring to hear her talk about all the future plans she has for the exhibit, and the long and strenuous process for selecting each year’s nominees. It was wonderful to hear that they have a very difficult time choosing which portraits to commision, because they have such a wide range of women to choose from.

At the Proclamation rememberance, it was very powerful to hear John Johnson, the Director of the Kentucky Commision on Human Rights speak about discrimination and equality and fairness. I believe we were all very moved by what he had to say. Most interesting were the comments shared by Mr. Colmon Elridge, the executive assistant to Gov. Beshear. It was amazing to heaar him talk about how much the Fair Housing Proclamation meant to him, as he is a young African-American man, and his wife is caucasian with a disability, yet they were faced with no difficulties when purchasing a house, which meant quite a lot to him.

Overall it was a wonderful day speaking with wonderful people about the amazing things happening in Kentucky, and I am grateful we were able to attend.

Progress

April 22, 2013 in 1960s-1970s

This week, we are working on compiling all the information we have gathered surrounding Anne Braden and her life. We are finally going to be able to make the trip to Louisville to visit the Anne Braden Institute this Wednesday after several weeks of scheduling conflicts. We hope this visit will help us nail down the details our final project and truly represent Anne Braden in the manner she deserves. We are excited for this opportunity, and we’ll be updating as the week goes on about what we encounter.

Especially now, with the semester winding down, it’s hard to believe we only started this class a few months ago. The projects are so involved and so in depth, I feel as if we have been in this class for years. This class was not at all what I expected – it is so much more. It is a privilege to be a part of discovering the history  of these important women, and I am so thankful that we have been able to do so.

Meeting A Legend

April 21, 2013 in 1960s-1970s

She lives in a quaint home, with a nice garden, and pink window frames.  The discerning trademark was a bumper sticker on the front door calling attention to Arizona’s controversial “show me your papers” law.  She was tiny, no greater than 5 feet, if that, and well dressed.  The walls of her beautiful home were covered in art, and there were books everywhere.  She was a whirlwind of “sit down,” and “come in” and “I expected you here [an hour earlier].”   Although there was a slight mix up in time, it actually worked out better in the end.

My partner and I were whisked away with Suzy to attend a memorial service for another Civil Rights Activist, Ruth “Babe” Booker Bryant. Babe was probably best known for being a part of the Louisville 6, a group that got arrested in Louisville’s West End.  Suzy had agreed to speak at the service, but she assured us she would speak to us in the car the entire trip to the funeral home, and she did.

On the ride there, she opened up to us about her experience in the women’s rights movement.    She raised some interesting points, like how important divorced women were to the movement, how radical women in the anti-war movement got stuck with the “shit work”, and the overall development of women’s own personal consciousness.  It was interesting learning how fundamental churches were to halting progress for women.  She also discussed her important work with Title IX. As an important figure in the ACLU, she wanted to utilize the ACLU’s resources to help women.

After the service, Suzy took us out for lunch at an Ethiopian restaurant.  She was very determined that we would have a good experience by at least trying something new.  In the kindest manner, she pushed food on us as though she were our own Jewish grandmother.  Then we were again invited into her gorgeous home.  We got the opportunity to look through newspaper clippings, booklets for various causes, and family photos.

At some point the interview stopped, and Suzy stopped being a subject.  Eventually we were just sitting in the living room of this amazing, amazing woman, talking to her about our own causes and concerns, trying to understand all her wisdom and compassion and drive.  She is an amazing person, with a family, with doubts and regrets.  After meeting her, I don’t believe that Suzy ever had a choice to be an activist, because when she saw inequality, (and when she continues to see it today), standing by and letting it happen was just never an option for her.

I realize how blessed I was to meet Suzy Post.  She had such great words to say to the next generation of activists, like, “Don’t give yourself the luxury of being depressed,” “you have to have comrades,” and “social change takes time and pressure, time and pressure, time and pressure.”  I am so glad to be able to lift her up, so that other people can learn about the amazing woman.

—————————————————————————————–

 http://www.uky.edu/Libraries/nkaa/record.php?note_id=4

 http://www.uky.edu/Libraries/nkaa/record.php?note_id=4

Skip to toolbar