You are browsing the archive for CORE.

by becca

Kentucky Forefathers of New York’s Rev. William A. Jones, Jr.

November 4, 2010 in 1960s-1970s, Genealogy

I began looking up different churches in Lexington that were around during the Civil Rights Movement. I came across a website and found Rev. William A. Jones, Jr.’s name, so I decided to look up more about him. Google was overflowing with information and articles about him – born in Louisville and growing up in Lexington – so I decided to take a look.

Rev. Dr. William Augustus Jones, Jr. (1934-2006)

Rev. Dr. William Augustus Jones, Jr. (1934-2006)

Before his death, Jones eventually had a 5,000 member church in Brooklyn. Reverend Jones was the grandson of the late Reverend Dr. Henry Wise Jones, Sr., of Green Street Baptist Church (in Louisville) and the son of the Reverend Dr. William Augustus Jones, Sr., of Pleasant Green Baptist Church, Lexington.

Reverend William A. Jones, Sr., KY Civil Rights Hall of Fame

Reverend William A. Jones, Sr. (1907-1968)

Reverend Jones, Sr. (1907-1968) was a very influential voice during the Civil Rights Movement and was the advisor of the Lexington chapter of CORE, or Congress of Racial Equality. It was in part because of Reverend Jones Sr. that the first African American City Councilman, Harry N. Sykes, was elected in Lexington.  He stood out publicly in opposition to the closing of Dunbar High School where hist children had graduated. After he died, Rev. Jones, Sr. was also the first African American to be buried in the Lexington Cemetery, which before had only been for white people.

The three generations of Rev. Jones are great to learn more about considering how many firsts they accomplished and helped to accomplish for the black community, not only in Kentucky, but in other parts of the country also.

The Power of Working Together

November 4, 2010 in 1940s-1950s, 1950s-1960s, Economic history, Political history, Social history

The history regarding the civil rights era and the efforts that were made locally here in Lexington, Kentucky have not been given proper time or coverage, as far as recording the history. That is partially our jobs in this class with our service learning projects. That why I wanted to bring up the power of working together. People from all over the city were using the help of groups such as the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.) and the National Association for the Advancenment of Colored People (N.A.A.C.P.), to organize protests and marches all across Fayette County.

Picture of Julia Etta Lewis (1932-1998), from 2001 Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame

Julia Etta Lewis (1932-1998), leader in the Lexington Congress of Racial Equality

Audrey Grevious

Audrey Grevious, leader of Lexington NAACP

Julius Berry, a Lexington native, spent much of his life advocating equality for black people in Kentucky and was involved with C.O.R.E. in tackeling the issue of desegregation in the public schools of Fayette County. At the same time as Julius Berry’s efforts on desegregation, Audrey Grevious and Julia Lewis combined their powers in the N.A.A.C.P. and C.O.R.E. together to arrange sit-ins and non-violent demostrations through out Lexington. The demonstrations and sit-in’s were usually aimed at the segregation of the entertainment businesses, restaurants, education, and public transportation.

These two women did remarkable work on the community level and they should be remembered for the strength they showed by working together and tying multiple resources together. If the community supports a movement, then change will come with leaders like Grevious and Lewis at the forefront of the local movement. As for Berry, his basketball carear probably influenced him to get involved with C.O.R.E. and the desegregation of the pubilc schools in Fayette County and across the commonwealth. The bottom line is that working together and combining resources under one movement will make life a lot easier for the people involved.

http://www.uky.edu/Libraries/NKAA/record.php?note_id=10

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congress_of_Racial_Equality

http://www.naacp.org/pledge/stop-hate3?source=sourceGoogle&subsource=subsourceNAACP&gclid=CPTkobHih6UCFRhg2god3UrLNg

by dawn

They Would Not Be Kept Down

October 22, 2010 in 1960s-1970s, Social history

Black woman were often more successful due to the promoted value of education in African American Community. According to Paula Giddings, blue collar male workers were paid more than females so sons were encouraged to drop out before daughters (329). 7.2% of Black females held profession jobs compared with 3.1% of Black males (Giddings, 329). A 9.6% of the African American physicians were black woman compared to only 7% of White female physicians (332). African American woman also felt more confident within their successful occupation when asked 74% felt if they suited their career were as only 49% of White females felt that they did a study done in 1964 (Giddings, 333).

During the civil rights movement Black organizations fighting for African American rights often were not interested in supporting female African Americans. Black men within such organizations such as the SNCC, Black Panther Party, CORE, and the SCLC seemed to only allow women within to gain so much power. According to Giddings, the men concerned about their masculinity tried to keep woman from speaking , having positions over men. They expected woman to do the grunt work and other non-leadership jobs such as taking notes, serving food and such.

Ella Baker a woman heavily involved in the SCLC, wrote: “There would never be any role for me in a leadership capacity with the SCLC. Why? First, I am a woman…. The combination of the basic attitude of Men, and especially ministers, as to what the role of women in their church setups is- that of taking orders, not providing leadership.”(Giddings, 312).
Angela Davis worked with the Los Angeles chapter of SNCC. In When and Where I Enter, Davis discussed how the men did less work than the women but then “women where involved in something important, they began to talk about women taking over the organization calling in a matriarchal coup d’etat.” (Giddings, 316).

This kind of treatment was common though out Black organizations. Within the Black Panther Party Kathleen Cleaver who was an officer encountered similar problems stating “if I suggested them, the suggestion might be rejected; if they were suggested by a man the suggestion would be implemented… the fact that the suggestion came from a woman gave it some lesser value.” (Giddings, 317).
Gloria Richardson participation in a rally was shouted down by member of CORE who called her a “Castrator” (Giddings, 317). Richardson’s experience expresses the fears of the men so bluntly. Men who were already oppressed by whites did not want to lose power and masculinity to their female counterparts.

Giddings, Paula. When and Where I Enter.  1983. William Morrow and Company, Inc.

by kcjohn2

The Non-Violent Movement

October 15, 2010 in 1960s-1970s, Oral history, Social history

From Greensboro, North Carolina to Lexington, Kentucky, 1960 marked the beginning of the non-violent civil rights movement. Although there had been other sit-ins before 1960, Greensboro sparked a nationwide trend, which began to change the country from one town to another. Our own Lexington was one of these towns, which took notice and began developing its own plan of action.

At the head of Lexington’s nonviolent movement was Audrey Grevious, a teacher and the President of the Lexington chapter of the NAACP at this time. Grevious, an amazing professional and community leader, worked with the Lexington members of CORE to decide which places to sit in first. They finally decided their first task would be to get more jobs for African Americans in the community. Not only would this bring the obvious, jobs, but would also boost the self-esteem of the African Americans in the community.

First, they picketed at the local grocery; they marched for blacks to be hired as cashiers. In the ‘60’s groceries were all white owned, and the white owners would only hire blacks as maintenance help. Their next task was to take on downtown, still trying to get blacks as cashiers in the local businesses. They marched on Main St. in front of businesses like, Purcell’s and Mitch Bakers. In listening to Ms. Grevious’ interview, I found it very interesting that Grave’s Cox was the only downtown business, which supported the movement. Unlike the two businesses above, Grave’s Cox is still in business today.

After the Lexington NAACP had succeeded in their mission to get some salespeople and cashiers in grocery stores and downtown businesses, they took on the lunch counters. This proved to be the most difficult. The actions of these narrow minded people, in something as simple as eating in the same place as someone else, were simply barbaric. Those involved in the non-violent movement were successful in not only getting the jobs and rights blacks deserved, but also in rising above the inhumanity of it all.

Much of my research came from the oral history the Kentucky Historical Society  did with Audrey Grevious’.  http://205.204.134.47/civil_rights_mvt/util.aspx?p=1&pid=14984

Skip to toolbar