You are browsing the archive for I Shared The Dream.

I Shared The Dream: Georgia Davis Powers & Others

March 31, 2013 in 1940s-1950s, 1950s-1960s, 1960s-1970s, Intellectual history, Oral history, Political history, Social history

After reading Georgia Davis Powers’ autobiography, I Shared the Dream: The Pride, Passion, and Politics of the First Black Woman Senator from Kentucky, my group led a book discussion on the most important themes and events addressed in the book. Most prominently, my group agreed that Georgia Davis Powers sought to portray herself as a real woman, someone who faces adversity and obstacles and makes conscious choices regarding her life which may not be seen in the public eye. In the book, Powers addresses her life and achievements but also her personal reflections on situations and relationships that had not been published until this book was written. My class has studied numerous influential women in Kentucky during the Civil Rights Movement and was able to draw important similarities between Senator Powers and other major figures.

The charts below represent a comparison of Georgia Davis Powers, Mae Street Kidd, and one other prominent figure of the student’s choosing. These diagrams intend to show relationships among the female leaders of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky as well as highlight key differences in their tactics and methodology.

Scan0006 Scan0007 Scan0008  Scan0011 Scan0010

Scan0009

 

She Shared A lot More Than The Dream

December 6, 2010 in 1960s-1970s

Georgia Davis Powers is and forever will be one of the most remarkable persons to have held a seat in the Kentucky Senate. She was honored for her contribution to the State by having a part of I-264 named after her earlier this year. Her push for equality in the state of Kentucky and by extension, the country is legendary but her connection to the noted civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King jr is what many would remember. Her book “I Shared The Dream” was written to clear up some misconceptions and misinformation about her relationship with Dr. King among other things.

In the book Senator Davis Powers is quite candid on a number of issues, the least of which are her past infidelities. Not many autobiographies are written with such candor. She warded off advances that she deemed inappropriate and succumbed to others that she knew was not the best thing to do. What some believe is still a question in many hearts and minds are how close her relationship with Dr. King was.

The book leaves a lot to be desired. Maybe there is more to come in the future because having heard from and spoken to this 87 year old firebrand, there has to be more in store for the eagerly awaiting public.

Senator Georgia Davis Powers has been honored with at least two honorary degrees from universities in Kentucky and there are more honors on the way.

To get a glimpse of her life, listen to her story on KET’s website and read her book.

Skip to toolbar