• ThumbnailDowntown Lexington has a long history of economic and social importance. Woolworth was a department store in Lexington from 1946 to 1990. Woolworths were located all over the country and became the first 5&10 cent store.  In 1960, at a North Carolina Woolworth , four African-American students sat at the counter to eat lunch. They were refused service […]

  • ThumbnailLast Thursday our class was privileged to hear not one, but two wonderful women speak about their influential lives (see the UK press release on this event with Senator Georgia Davis Powers). One of those women was Eleanor Jordan. Eleanor Jordan was born in Louisville in 1953. Although she was young when a lot of the civil […]

  • What a great accomplish- to be able to claim the title of the first women dentist in Kentucky!
    It’s unfortunate that she wasn’t always given the credit she deserved, but it’s thanks to classes like ours, we can recognize her achievements and tell others about her work.

  • On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to move seats in order to accompany a white passenger and to move to the back of an Alabama bus, as the law stated she must since she was African-American. She was promptly arrested for this action, a small price to pay for the change she brought on. […]

  • This journal really made me stop and think; when I generally think of politics I automatically think old, white men. Times really did change when people such as Nancy Pelosi, Condoleeza Rice, and, of course, Barak Obama were elected into office, but reading your statistics seems as if little has changed with who we elect […]

  • I began looking up different churches in Lexington that were around during the Civil Rights Movement. I came across a website and found Rev. William A. Jones, Jr.’s name, so I decided to look up more about him. G […]

  • I do believe the past can repeat itself in some instances, but I would really hope that such discrimination of one particular race would not be one of those instances. I am studying to be a high school teacher and I really want to teach in a lower income school, particularly in Washington D.C., because […]

  • I was shocked to discover that the University of Kentucky’s womens basketball team was actually started a year before the mens in 1902. However, that excitement was almost immediately shut down when I read that in 1924 the University Senate passed a bill that discontinued the womens team because if the game was too strenuous […]

  • I’m really glad that you put this on here because the hardships in Eastern Kentucky hadn’t really crossed my mind during this class. But, I know they were incredibly tragic and it’s good to remember those who put worth great effort to help others. Katherine Pettit seemed like a wonderful human being.

  • She has a really inspiring story. I had never heard of her before, but I think it’s good that we can find pretty much unknown women of this time period who fought for others rights and learn more about them. She obviously led a very successful life when it comes to fighting for civil rights. […]

  • Since I’m studying to be a high school teacher, I found this website really cool. It’s all about different African American teachers teaching in Kentucky during the Civil Rights Movement. http://www.uky.edu/Libraries/NKAA/subject.php?sub_id=33 The very first story caught my eye. It’s about Vallateen Virginia Dudley Abbington. First of all, her name is awesome. Second of all, she went […]

  • I found this website and thought it was awesome because you can actually listen to the stories of people that experienced hardships during the Civil Rights Movement. http://205.204.134.47/civil_rights_mvt/media.aspx?p=5 I listened to Howard Bailey’s story, who said that adults, not just children, but ADULTS would throw rocks at the bus he had to ride. It’s so sad […]

  • Being only the second African American to graduate from college is amazing enough, but the fact that she did all the other amazing things in her life like taking charge of the detention home for juvenile African American offenders is awesome. Definitely someone to look up to.

  • That’s great that she didn’t follow the typical role of women of the time and be just a stay-at-home mommy. It’s good that she fought for what she believed in and took action by proposing an amendment.

  • I looked up the history of the Louisville Metro Police Department to see when women and african americans were first allowed to be a part of the program. In 1921, Alice Dunlop was the first women to join the team and in 1923 the first african american joined which brought the total number of women […]

  • I decided to research women in Kentucky’s history who have made some sort of impact, whether big or small and came across Lyda “Gertrude” Ramey . When Lyda was a little girl her entire family died of influenza, leaving her alone and having to go from home to home as a foster child. As she got older […]

  • http://apps.sos.ky.gov/secdesk/sosinfo/default.aspx?id=62 This website gives many facts about Emma Guy Cromwell’s life, including what she accomplished in her lifetime. It also has a great quote for her: “Time has softened but has not dimmed this grief and I have found a panacea in hard work, and filled my life with duty and my heart with thought […]

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