• Men like like William English Walling were few and far between. He reminds me of Ms. “Lukey” Ward.

  • A Todd Co. connection! I’m amazed. I lived in Todd Co. all my life until coming to the University of Kentucky, and I never knew of this amazing woman. This goes to show how important our class is. We are bringing to light women, who may never have been.

  • I completely agree, this class has made me not only appreciate the work the women before us have done to grant us equal rights to men, but it has also made me realize how important it is to not just sit back and wait for someone else to change things.

  • This coincides with my article on segregated libraries. Many whites constantly wanted to hold African American back from education so that they would always have a group to feel superior to.

  • I wonder what brought her to Kentucky, whether it was the need for more feminist activists in the state or because of personal reasons. Kentucky needed and still needs more women activists such as herself.

  • I can’t imagine being denied employment after working so hard towards a PhD. Instead of dwelling on her misfortune, she took action and began to organize women to stop this injustice. We should continue to do so today.

  • This just shows once again it only takes one person to make a change, especially in education. We need more educators like Dr. Akers.

  • Lucretia “Lukey” Ward was different from most affluent, white women in Louisville, KY. Ms. Ward took a stand against the inequalities in Louisville, KY and all over the South. Like her friend, Senator Georgia Davis Powers , Ward believed in the equality for all; African Americans, women, children, and the poor. She became active in politics, vying […]

  • ThumbnailIn today’s age of technology and abundant resources, we take many things for granted. Most things are right at the tips of our fingers, only needing a click of a mouse to find whatever it is we would like to know more about. Libraries like the New York Public Library , for example, have even begun to publish […]

  • Senator Powers is another example of one person’s power to change the injustices in society. One person’s dream can inspire a movement. It is evident in her book, she was born a leader. The candor in her book is refreshing. She does not sugar coat the bad like others sometimes do, nor does she dwell […]

  • In the days of Jim Crow laws , the “Colored Notes” section was a staple in every mainstream newspaper in the country. The “Colored Notes” included social information concerning the African American community. Not only did the section report on the activities of the professional and middle class, but also included special honors or events pertaining to […]

  • Watkins exploration of feminism, race, gender, and class together is so important. It sometimes hard to wrap your brain around all the ideas together, but their relationship needs to be examined together to fully understand the injustices in and the attitudes of our society.

  • It takes a special person to not just go with the flow of things and continually question the norms of society. Anne Braden was not just a special person, but an extraordinary woman and citizen. If the few people like Anne Braden had not existed, where would we be today? I also ask myself this […]

  • This “milestone” in Kentucky’s history shows to be even more significant after hearing the struggle Senator Georgia Davis Powers went through to have this passed. It took compromise, will power, and strength to get the job done. She had to continually fight for what she believed in in her terms as a Kentucky state senator.

  • As I read this post, I couldn’t help but remember Ms. Valinda Livingston’s talk in the MLK center. Racism is continually perpetuated in the public school system. Black teachers and students alike, as well as the schools which are a majority black are treated like second class citizens. They can’t afford the tools to educate […]

  • Racism in the North was deep seeded like in the South. Places like Detroit faced insurmountable oppositions to equal rights. This is a great discussion to have posed. Also, a great book find!

  • kcjohn2 commented on the post, Lucy Harth Smith 9 years ago

    Her accomplishment in getting books to the schools is an invaluable accomplishment. These book educated the students, who could have held key roles in the civil rights movement. Education leads to so much more.

  • ThumbnailAs I continue my research on women in the civil rights movement, it is the bridge, community leaders, which I find myself interested in finding more out about. These women were not the face of the movement, but the wheels behind it, which kept it moving. These women have the most interesting stories to tell, but […]

  • I was very interested in Margaret’s comments at the race dialogues Thursday about the busing system in Louisville. It seems like it has provided a more fair education system in Louisville. Glad you researched this issue more.

  • Each child should be afforded the same opportunities as any other. It is devastating to think a child on one side of town will not be afforded the same education and opportunities as another. Mrs. Livingston opened my eyes and inspired me to be a part of trying to change things.

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