Activism

photo (18)Post came from a family very active in their community, and she continued that tradition.  A product of the times, she really got swept up on the activism around her, motivated by a strong Jewish ethic and a spit-fire personality.  Although being a housewife and mother took up much of Post’s time, she needed more to lead a personally fulfilling life.  Throughout her life, she was engaged in a variety of causes, but the first cause in which she really got her hands dirty was the civil rights movement.  She was determined to have her voice heard in the open housing campaign. Through the years, she truly grew as an activist, finding herself as an embodied continuation of a progressive thread that had been running through the centuries.

“And where I am as a white woman was made possible by those who came before me. And where I am now as a successful advocate for social justice is because of the people who taught me and came before me. So I think there’s a strong understanding that none of us got here by ourselves, that we are part of some kind of current, some kind of social fabric, that goes back a long, long way, and that we’re only the current face.”[1]

Post worked alongside several other prominent activists.  Some of these include Anne Braden; Senator John Lewis, who got his start as the SNCC president; and Senator Georgia Davis Powers.

Although she got her start in civil rights, she was among many who were propelled to take up the cause for women’s rights as a result.  Post used the ACLU as a vessel to promote women. She also created the reproductive freedom (pro-choice) project for the ACLU, to promote women’s health freedoms.[2]



[1] Timothy, Patrick McCarthy. 2009. Interview with suzy post. Journal for the Study of Radicalism 3, (1): 145-173, http://ezproxy.uky.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/213913050?accountid=11836 (accessed March 3, 2013).

[2] Post, Suzy. Interview by Katelyn Sandell and Tahnee Qualls. Digital recording. April 20, 2013. Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries, Lexington, KY.

 

NEXT: Civil Rights Movement

 

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