Living the Story – KET Production

LeDatta Grimes, AASRP graduate student, facilitated the Sisters in the Struggle Dialogues on Race, September 16, 2010

LeDatta Grimes facilitating UK AASRP Dialogues on Race "Sisters in the Struggle," Martin Luther King Jr. Cultural Center, September 16, 2010

Women’s voices in “Living the Story, The Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky” Kentucky Educational Television http://www.ket.org/civilrights/

This project includes a timeline and Image Gallery as well as resources for K-12 teachers.

NOTE: You will need RealPlayer® to view the videos. See the KET help page for information on obtaining the software.)

Valinda Livingston facilitating AASRP Dialogues on Race "Sisters in the Struggle:" Audrey Grevious, Martin Luther King, Jr. Cultural Center, October 14, 2010

Valinda Livingston facilitating AASRP Dialogues on Race "Sisters in the Struggle:" Audrey Grevious, Martin Luther King, Jr. Cultural Center, October 14, 2010

The Kentucky Oral History Commission, a division of the Kentucky Historical Society, started the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Oral History Project in 1998 to gather stories from the civil rights era in the 1950s and ’60s. Dr. Betsy Brinson, project director, and Dr. Tracy K’Meyer of the University of Louisville conducted and taped interviews with more than 175 participants in the movement.

Dr. Catherine Fosl, Anne Braden Institute, University of Louisville

Dr. Catherine Fosl, UofL Anne Braden Institute, will facilitate the UK AASRP Dialogues on Race "Sisters in the Struggle:" Anne Braden, at MLK Jr. Cultural Center, 4:30 p.m., November 18, 2010

As part of the Civil Rights in Kentucky Oral History Project, the Kentucky Oral History Commission and Historical Society produced full-length video interviews with many of the project participants under the title Living the Story: The Rest of the Story. This series of 14 videos, most an hour long, contains unedited versions of original one-on-one interviews that were excerpted for the “Living the Story” television documentary. Producer/director Arthur Rouse created the television series in which fifteen Kentuckians tell what they saw, heard and experienced – as they acted on their convictions to make great changes leading to legal and social equality in Kentucky. (See the full list of interviewees at www.ket.org/civilrights/restofstory.htm.)

In the Fall semester of 2010 the University of Kentucky African American Studies and Research Program featured the women of this program in their Dialogues on Race series in partnership with the UK Martin Luther King Jr. Cultural Center and the “Sisters in the Struggle” History 351 course taught at UK that semester by Randolph Hollingsworth.

Audrey Grevious
Lexington (1930- )

Picture of Audrey Grevious, Lexington, (1930 - )
Grevious served as president of the Lexington chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in the 1960s, working with other local civil rights leaders for peaceful integration of businesses. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_grevious.htm.
Anne Braden
Louisville (1924-2006)

Picture of Anne Braden
Braden, a lifelong activist, became embroiled in one of Louisville’s most notorious incidents of race-based violence when she and her husband, both white, were asked to buy a house in an all-white neighborhood in order to resell it to a black family. The house was bombed, and the Bradens were branded Communist conspirators and tried for sedition in 1954. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_braden.htm.
Abby Marlatt
Lexington (1916-?)

Picture of Abby Marlatt of Lexington
While teaching at the University of Kentucky in the 1960s, Marlatt helped organize students and train them in the principles of nonviolent protest, joining them at sit-ins and other actions that led to the desegregation of many public facilities in Lexington. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_marlatt.htm.
Grace Lewis
Louisville (1948- )

Grace Lewis of Louisville
One of the first African Americans to attend a white school in Jefferson County, Lewis went on to a career in civil service and involvement in other civil rights actions, including the campaign to free activist Angela Davis. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_lewis.htm.
Senator Georgia Davis Powers
Louisville (1923 – )

Picture of Georgia Davis Powers in 1999
Powers was the first African American elected to the Kentucky Senate. First elected in 1968, she served for 21 years and championed bills prohibiting discrimination by race, sex, and age. Previously, she had helped organize the 1964 civil rights March on Frankfort. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_powers.htm.
Alice Wilson
Mayfield (1941 – )

Alice Wilson of Mayfield KY
Alice Wilson was one of 10 African-American students who decided to enroll at Mayfield High School shortly after the Brown v. Board of Education decision declared “separate but equal” schools unconstitutional. While they were allowed to attend, they often felt ignored by their teachers and were taunted by white students, some of whom staged protests outside the school. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_awilson.htm
Jennie Wilson
Mayfield (1900-?)

Picture of Jennie Hopkins Wilson
Wilson was born in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1900 to parents who had been slaves. After the Civil War, her parents became sharecroppers and as a girl, Wilson worked in the tobacco fields. Having learned to cook from her mother, she also cooked in white people’s homes and for large parties. She raised four children, all of whom went to college: two to Howard University in Washington, DC and two to Hampton Institute in Hampton, VA. Watch the video online and see more information at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm.


See also the longer descriptions on the interviews detailed on this site on the KHS page.

Other Oral Histories

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