Ella Berry: A Moving Activist

October 5, 2010 in 1920s-30s, 1940s-1950s, Political history

                Ella Berry is an example of an African American woman from Kentucky who simply would not quit or give up on her goals and in order to accomplish her goals, she would move. Originally born in Stanford, Kentucky, Berry quickly realized that she would have to move towards bigger cities as many African Americans were doing in the early 20th century with the two great migrations. She moved to Louisville and then quickly again to Chicago. While in Louisville she began campaigning for women to have the right to vote and for African Americans to have the right to vote. She moved to Chicago as a young adult activists and sufferist to continue her work on womens and African Americans right to vote.[1]

                While in Chicago she helped start the Huges Colored Woman’s Club and the National Republican Headquarters as two more means of spreading her overall goal of more rights and equality of women and African Americans in the United States. She constantly made trips back to Louisville to keep open a network of political ideas and to continue spreading her own ideas and words back in her home state of Kentucky.[2] The fact that she found it extremely important to continue with the work she started in Louisville and with her work in Chicago shows how truly committed she was to the overall improvement of blacks and women in the United States. She made it her lifes goal to be involved in everything she could to improve the lives of women and blacks, not only in Kentucky but all across the United States.


[1] Reinette Jones and the University of Kentucky Libraries, www.uky.edu/Libraries/NKAA/subject.php?sub_id+164.

[2] Reinette Jones and the University of Kentucky Libraries, www.uky.edu/Libraries/NKAA/subject.php?sub_id+164.

1 response to Ella Berry: A Moving Activist

  1. For a larger historical context, see also Lisa G. Materson,
    _For the Freedom of Her Race: Black Women and Electoral Politics in Illinois, 1877-1932_ (UNC Press Books, 2009).

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to toolbar